How to get an Additional Crossover: Think Parking Part III

Earlier this year we wrote about subdividing your land without Common Property. Subdividing without Common Property simplifies Land Titles and removes the need for an Owner’s Corporation (not to mention annual meetings and fees!).

Now that you’re Thinking Parking, if you want to subdivide without common property, your next question is: will Council allow independent vehicle access for each unit?

How to get an Additional Crossover: Think Parking Part III

Common Property typically arises in multi-unit developments because two or more units need to share the same driveway.

The key to subdividing your land without Common Property lies in your ability to secure independent vehicle access for each unit (ie. avoiding a shared driveway).

Even more specifically, this relies on obtaining permission from Council for an Additional Crossover.

When will Council allow an Additional Crossover?

Unless otherwise specified in Local Planning policy, the ability to secure an Additional Crossover is covered in the Victorian State Planning Provision Clause 55.03-9 Standard B14 under “Access Objectives” which states:

The width of accessways should not exceed:

  • – 33 per cent of the street frontage, or
  • – If the width of the street frontage is less than 20 metres, 40 per cent of the street frontage.

– No more than one single-width crossover should be provided for each dwelling fronting a street.

– The location of crossovers should maximise the retention of on-street car parking spaces.

Additional Crossovers: Case Study

On the surface these requirements seem straightforward, however pay particular attention to that last line.

You should demonstrate to Council Planners that even with an additional crossover your proposal will not remove any on street car parking spaces.

To demonstrate this, consider the diagram below:

Both Development A and Development B:

  • – Propose a Dual Occupancy with independent vehicle access (ie. no share driveway/common property), and
  • – Comply with the maximum crossover width requirements, and
  • – Have no more than 1 single width crossover for each dwelling.

YET the location of the Additional Crossover for Development A removes an on street car parking space.

The location of the Additional Crossover for Development B retains the on street car parking space – thus alleviating Council concerns.

Additional Crossovers: Nature Strip and other Council assets

It should also be noted that these relatively simple requirements are made somewhat more complex by various assets and features that may limit where you can place a crossover.

Assets or features that may affect the location of your crossover/driveway include:

  • Nature strip assets – such as electricity poles, fire hydrants, telstra boxes etc, and/or
  • Gutter assets – such as stormwater drains or pits, and/or
  • Nature strip features – such as significant trees, and/or
  • Road assets – such as nearby traffic islands, speed humps, vehicle intersections etc.
fail owned pwned pictures

Here’s what happens when you don’t ‘Think Parking’!

If you are considering an additional crossover, be sure to understand the implications of all assets and features that may constrain your crossover placement.

How to get an Additional Crossover: Conclusion

The ability to secure an Additional Crossover is covered in the Victorian State Planning Provision Clause 55.03-9 Standard B14 “Access Objectives”.

You should demonstrate to Council Planners that even with an additional crossover your proposal will not remove any on street car parking spaces.

If you are considering an additional crossover, be sure to understand the implications of all assets and features that may constrain your crossover placement.

fail owned pwned pictures

“Can somebody say ‘Significant Tree’?”